3 former Dolphins players who failed with their new team in 2023

Miami probably doesn't regret letting these guys walk last year.

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New England Patriots v Buffalo Bills / Rich Barnes/GettyImages
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2. Eric Rowe, S, Pittsburgh Steelers

For years, Rowe was a mainstay in Miami – the veteran appeared in 63 games over four seasons with Miami, starting 39 of those games.

After the Dolphins let him walk, he signed with the Steelers practice squad midway through last season, joining Pittsburgh in mid-November. He ended up appearing in 3 games for the Steelers, forcing two turnovers (one INT, one forced fumble) in the process. He bounced on and off the active roster for the rest of the season, and the Steelers let his contract expire soon after.

Rowe's final couple of seasons were rough to watch at times, and there doesn't seem like there's currently much of a market for him – especially considering all the other available safeties this year. He was a great player in his prime, but not someone that Miami misses.

3. Trey Flowers, EDGE, New England Patriots

It's wild to think that Flowers' five-year, $90 million deal with the Detroit Lions was only four years ago.

After four straight years of averaging seven sacks per season, Flowers' production fell off a cliff shortly after coming to Detroit. Injuries are a big part of Flowers' NFL career – he appeared in only seven games in both 2021 and 2022, and the Lions' decided to part ways with two years left on his contract.

And then in August of 2022, Flowers signed a one-year deal with the Dolphins ... only to appear in four games before being put on injured reserve for the rest of the year. His stats with Miami are bleak: four games, four tackles, and zero sacks. He signed with the Patriots after that season, but has yet to make an appearance since – the last game he played was the Dolphins' Week 6 loss to the Vikings.

He's had a hell of a career, winning two Super Bowls in New England before securing generational wealth in Detroit, but the end of it – if this is indeed the end – was forgettable.

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