Miami Dolphins are far from fixed

Jan 9, 2016; Davie, FL, USA; Miami Dolphins owner Stephen Ross addresses reporters during a press conference at Doctors Hospital Training Facility. Mandatory Credit: Steve Mitchell-USA TODAY Sports
Jan 9, 2016; Davie, FL, USA; Miami Dolphins owner Stephen Ross addresses reporters during a press conference at Doctors Hospital Training Facility. Mandatory Credit: Steve Mitchell-USA TODAY Sports /
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The harsh reality for the Miami Dolphins is that things don’t look good for the team moving forward. It seems as if this team is continuing down the same path that has most recently lead them nowhere.

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The Dolphins approach to this offseason give them few ideal choices. Do they try to retain the players they deem valuable to the franchise? Do they wash their hands clean of some players to create more cap space? Or, do they clean house and focus on the draft to start anew?

Sure, we can wave our pom poms in the air and tell ourselves everything will be ok and that our Miami Dolphins are a good football team, but what good does that do? That’s the sort of mentality that makes watching the Dolphins—year in and year out—so tough. This is why when we watch the Dolphins’ season circle the drain every year we are sad, disappointed, and pissed off.

More than likely, Olivier Vernon, the team’s leader in sacks, will be gone next year. The Dolphins leading rusher, Lamar Miller, will be gone; and Rishard Mathews, an up and coming wide receiver, will be gone, as well.

So, where does that leave the Miami Dolphins? It leaves them in a place they’ve grown eerily accustomed to: mediocrity.

There’s simply too much to fix to think the front office and coaches will have this team patched up and running strong next season. In reality, this is a project that will take some time. If my assumptions are right and the Dolphins lose all of the aforementioned players this offseason, it won’t necessarily be a bad thing. The key here is to remain realistic. Say it with me, “realistic.”

That’s better. Now we can allow ourselves to be open-minded and pragmatic when looking at the Dolphins’ future.

At the bare minimum, the Dolphins need: two defensive ends, two cornerbacks, two linebackers, a free safety, two guards, one more left tackle, a running back, and another wide receiver. I won’t even touch the quarterback position. That ship has sailed.

With all of those needs, it’s not “realistic” to think new head coach Adam Gase and his staff will fill them overnight, or in one offseason for that matter. If this process brings in a winner, fans will wait as long as they can.

As I mentioned last week, with so many needs, the best thing for the Dolphins to do would be to fix one problem at a time. With the goal of a winning season far beyond the Dolphins reach, it’s the best thing for them to do.